Silicon Valley Season 2

Silicon Valley is funny. Mike Judge has a lot of cred in finding the absurd in the modern middle class and suburban, which as the shows executive producer, this style is expertly done with Valley. The show has always done a great job of actually telling jokes, and finding the humor from character motives rather than tacking what they could shoehorn in.

I really liked season one of this show, and I liked season two, which recently wrapped up its run on HBO.

Unfortunately, the show is already showing fatigue. The show’s plot revolves around the continual fight of Pied Piper versus the CEO of Hoolie attempting to gain control of Piper’s middle-out data compression algorithm through any means necessary as the staff of Piper try to secure funding to fully launch their product.

The problem with this setup is that it is completely episodic and random – "Oh look, Hooli is pulling some bullshit legal tactic, oh now they’re doing something else I already forgot about because it’s brushed off as soon as it happened, WHAT? our angel investor is a crazy person and now he’s doing weird eccentric thing X, which as with Hooli we’ll discard as a memory and plot thread when the credits roll."

It’s not a story that actually builds, and because of that, when the Piper crew eventually succeeds, I don’t really have a sense that they were up against much, but just annoyed throughout the season.

In contrast, season one actually built towards the Tech Crunch Disrupt, and involved more than outside annoyances - the relationships of the team, transition to a real company, and competition. A lot more intuitive, and as an audience member you can anticipate conflict and what you would expect from a growing company.

Which all of that totally sucks as this season actually had more heart.

Richard’s pep talk that the team was there and existed to “build epic shit” alongside Jared’s maudlin speech that he has had the best time being at Pied Piper even though it involved so much stress, which takes something really commodified, the start-up, and actually gives it some warmth.

There’s a lot of folks in Silicon Valley and here in Seattle less concerned about what they are passionate about, and more concerned with what will sell, and this is more insidious than some huge company like Hooli. It’s an internal and intentionally adopted destruction of one’s dreams, rather than an antagonistically driven defeat.

The Piper crew appears to genuinely want to do more for people, and the speeches delivered by Jared and Richard legitimize this drive contrasted excellently with Belson’s comment that “I don't want to live in a world where someone else is making the world a better place better than we are.”

I look forward to season three, but I hope that the humor and conflict can grow from these heartfelt motives in order to find insight within the laughs.