I don't understand why you don't understand my Views

Drupal developers typically follow this pattern when they start to work with layout systems: nodes to blocks to maybe panels to Views. Now these are obviously intertwining and of course a lot of us jump into custom templates and Views-like modules that aggregate and filter content.

As a Drupal dev, looking at these elements the progression seems pretty obvious and is natural to content management. First you create content chunks, then you arrange more specialized content pieces, and finally you start creating lists and contextual filters of content.

Speaking with clients who are actually going to use your system, however, this progression to and use of Views isn’t as natural or intuitive.

For a lot of folks not in web development, pages of content are just that - individual documents that stand alone. They aren’t nodes, they definitely aren’t fields, and from there the concept of filtering nodes to access fields is a conversation that isn’t going to translate well between dev and non-dev. But particularly when using systems like Taxonomy or Nodequeue with Views, where curation is a focus, it’s critical that users understand the basic idea.

So what is the best way to get these ideas across?

Tech terms is obviously a non-starter. Referencing SQL or the index.php query system won’t help. Neither will the name “Views”. It’s just too general, and worse yet if a person has enough knowledge to understand what a “view” is within MVC, as it can be easily confused with templates.

Thus, keep terminology to “Lists” and “Filtered Lists” or whatever wording works best. 

The simplest way to explain Views from there is to explain that these lists are lists of pages that use their parts, and we can set filters to “go get” the pages we want and just get their “Title” for example.

Here again, saying “fields” and “content types” is not very helpful either. Likewise, when discussing filters, if you’re using Taxonomy, “label” or similar may work best since that’s more common in other SaaS platforms to do the same function.

From there, concepts like limit / count, pager and such are a little more familiar to most people involved who use the web.

The key point therefore is to step out of the Drupal lingo and start thinking in terms of what’s more common. If users reach the point where lingo becomes important, then it’s fine to switch over, but until then, communicating the key operational concepts is more vital than keeping things in Drupalesque.