Cheers to small books

Recently I picked up Thomas Schwarzl’s 2D Game Collision Detection. It’s a couple years old, and I already have books that are much more thorough on game development such as Mathematics and Physics for Programmers and Game Physics Engine Development, but I wanted a book that was as stripped down and direct as possible on its topic, which I needed a little boning up on.

And indeed the book did exactly what it said it would do and no more, a result that a lot of programming books in general fail to deliver on. Simple question - how do I solve the tunneling problem in collision detection? For Schwarzl it’s a couple pages, and for a lot of books their thoroughness in answering this programming problem can become less of a technical issue and more of a readership problem.

While I wouldn’t knock books attempting to provide a lot of knowledge for my page-buying buck, I would say instead that there is a space missing in programming literature, which is the small book, and in particular, the small specialized book.

I have a couple of algorithm books on my shelves (well, in stacks on my floor), but some of these, while serving as rich collegiate textbooks aren’t anything that can really engage the beginner or improve the intermediate developer.

By all means, I won’t return Sedgewick’s Algorithms, however, I would like to see books along the lines of 4 Sorting Algorithms that barely trump 90 pages. Books of this variety wouldn’t be intended to be the end of all of study, but could provide a low cost of entry into a new subject without intimidation, high cost or excessive detail.

Sometimes, you just want to be told in a few sentences what a bubble sort is without, for the moment, worrying about its O-notation compared to other algorithms. Similar series elsewhere - A Very Short Introduction, How to Read…, and every book on meditation - demonstrate the practicality and demand for reading of this type.

The You Don’t Know series focused on JavaScript from Kyl Simpson is a perfect example - meeting all these criteria: short, detailed in a specialized topic and not too much extraneous information. Want to know about closures thoroughly but JUST closures, well Simpson’s written that book.

As literacy in programming expands, I do expect that these types of books will appear more consistently and we’ll see a move away from textbook or language survey tomes and more about how to use languages involving very specific topics in a way that readers can quickly consume and then apply their understanding.

Course I guess I could start writing them myself...