Angelfire Retrospective

Angelfire was the first place I learned to code. And to learn how to design websites. The latter of which I never really got into, but in the past I didn't even think there would be a distinction. It was all part of programming, you did everything yourself, right? Not that there was much out there to really get excited about.

To those unaware, Angelfire in the mid-nineties, alongside GeoCities, was one of the most popular website that hosted websites. However, more than just a hosting company, Angelfire and its peers created similar platforms as WordPress, Blogger and others of that ilk.

This was the era of frames, <i> tags and most especially tables. No CSS, no JavaScript, something called CGI that did form processing (totally over my head at the time) - but the one thing it gave you was a real live website address on the Web.

I would navigate to my page, a made-up skateboarding company where I made designs using MS Paint, every day. I would try and load it on school computers, and I would use the first edition of HTML For Dummies to try and implement every possible tag, including <blink>. 

These were halcyon days of development for a young teen, as the HTML isn't processor or platform intensive and so provided me, and others I'm sure, with the ability to code without paying for Microsoft's development suite or even Borland's C++ compiler (which I eventually owned). Instead, you could just build something on your desktop, try it out and share it. Sure it was painfully slow, but it was a start.;

The details of Angelfire's purchase by Lycos and other minor points about its business (did you know it started as a medical transcription service?) are pretty nineties and not very exciting, but the late nights from this pain-in-the-ass web host will always make the name Angelfire perk my ears up.