Four Documentaries on Arcade Gaming and why most documentaries are boring recently

Couple quick thoughts on this group of recent nostalgic bouts:

Chasing Ghosts

With the most history and interviews, this is a good compendium of the rise of the arcade period in the early / mid-eighties. Sadly, it's not really interesting and there's nothing really to draw from knowing this information, or at least something the filmmakers want you to take away. The film has no key tension, other than an arcade champions reunion, which the filmmakers never underscore why this was the central crux of the movie, other than it's something that actually happened presently. 

High Score

The worst amongst the movies, the film follows a gamer attempting to break the Missle Command high score. While it's a good objective goal for the main character, it doesn't really have any actual impact on the film. It's just, again, something that happens. Video game records are usually video recorded and mailed in, so the attempts themselves are not very dramatic, and more importantly, achieving Missle Command high scores is an endurance challenge rather than a skill excellence. Since the most exciting event would be somebody to stay up for 80 hours playing video games, it makes this move really slow and ultimately says very little about gaming.

King of Kong

Another record attempt, in this case Donkey Kong high score, held at the time of the film by Billy Mitchell. Mitchell is the best arcade gamer of all time, and has an amazingly arrogant and proud personality, so this film, while the record is only a little interesting, is fun to watch because there's actually an antagonist to the main character's goal that registers with the audience. Doesn't say much about the game or gaming generally, but Mitchell's personality makes the film worth it. 

Space Invaders

Best of the bunch - Space Invaders documents several very elaborate personal arcade collections, delves into the history of arcade gaming and the video game hysteria in the 80s, and tries to get an understanding of why people would devote so much to such large, old fashioned games. Ultimately that answer is mainly nostalgia, and touching of one's youth, but the filmmakers discuss collecting more generally and what it is to maintain something that is horribly out of date. 

 

Most of these movies are bad. Not just low budget, but boring, dull and wandering. The problem in the ones above and in a lot of low-budget documentaries coming out is the miss the point of making a film - to make us feel something and connect with a different world, just like a fictional movie. Instead, most of these new documentaries are things just happening that are being filmed.

By far the worst I've seen is SOMM on a group of men trying to attain the highest rank of sommelier in the US. The movie just thinks that you can show peopel drinking fancy wines and somehow I'll care, because, you know, I like wine. However, even though it's a rigid test, the film never really sets up the conflict of passing it. They just create a mystique that it's hard, but I don't know why it should be that hard (say, if you watched a movie on astroanut training you'd understand why the bar is so high) and why I should care that people can pass the test. 

Likewise with the gaming films above, the filmmakers appear to have thought - hey, here's a gaming thing, let's shoot reels, throw in a couple transitions of close ups of joysticks and old game art, and we got a film. I'd like to say I'm insulted, but in truth, I figure the intentions of the documentarians were pure, it's just that the material is not all that exciting

Video game high scores just aren't that interesting to modern gamers nor are they visually very interesting. Watch some bad ass on Call of Duty pwn and you'll at least see something visually cool, but Donkey Kong, whether the first level or the last screen, still pretty much looks the same at every point in the game. Score are also very antithetical to the intent of the modern gaming community to be more open and inviting rather than ultra competitive. High scores breed people like Billy Mitchell, who don't make me want to play video games. This doesn't mean there aren't competitive people, it just means, the epitome of a great gamer is not necessarily his/her competitiveness. In fact, in games like Minecraft, it may be the exact opposite.