Code Fetishism is Bad

I hate this shit:

This shit:

Oh and this shit:

Granted - I get why these scenes are in television and movies. It takes a dry subject and makes it look a little more interesting than not at all. Furthermore, technology always carries a little bit of mystique with it. That's fair, and I don't think movies should stop doing it. I'd hate to have to watch some hacker character run Linux updates when they could have cool graphs and code moving on screen. 

But I can't get past it. There's three main issues I have with them and all of them undermine actually people becoming awesome superhackers: 

Confusion about knowledge to action. There is a lot of stuff you need to do to make code work, even hacked together code. There's a lot of support programs, technical manuals and such that you have to slog through. Hey, but we got a goal so it's worth the sacrifice. Sure, movies set up false expectations about the work involved in everything, but there's not even a training montage in computer movies. 

Focus on self satisfaction. It's like watching the Food Network - chopping potatoes is an exquisite experience, but satisfaction in the actual cooking, at least for me, doesn't come from softly smelling rosemary fresh cut, but from the assemblage of everything. In The Social Network in particular, the slow and overly dramatic drawing of the algorithm, while very cool, is not the point of what Zuckerberg is even doing in the scene. It's pointlessly indulgent, and therefore a waster of any decent coder's time to revel in such things. 

Confusion between what's in great use vs what's in actually reflective or meaningful. Maybe this is just a hole in the market for movies where people actually withdraw meaning from interacting with computers and code, but all of this flash, unrealistic flash at that, ego focused flash, visualizes excellence within computing and even hacking, it such a false and bullshit way, that it distorts what's substantive. 

Each one of those issues, ultimately deters people from computing, as they completely misdirect its value and confuse where you find meaning therein. It's a false advertisement. 

I suppose people can look past it, and perhaps these are entry points, but the fetishism is ultimately abandoned nonetheless.