Drupal Summit in Vancouver

There's a scene in Eurotrip, where a group of dudes heads to a nude beach expecting to see girls, only to find that the entire beach is filled with dudes, also expecting to see women.

Every summit/convention/expo I've been to for tech has this feel to it. It's as if everyone going there is looking to connect and make this break in their career with a new contact, see a new product or company. Maybe finally get that real coding job they've wanted for so long. But with everyone there with the same objective, it's hard to make any progress.

I'm not sure what I was looking for when I went to the Drupal Summit in Vancouver this last month. I wanted to present, which I I did - Stealing from the Core and Elsewhere. I hoped this presentation would be a challenge to me and involve me with perhaps with some more serious Drupal developers. 

Unfortunately, I may have put too much into my session, which lesson learned I suppose. Because I presented on application development in JavaScript, folks (some) thought I was just a Node.js geek and this system was just imitating it. Given the fact that my application was not an asyncronous server tool, even explicitly saying my server side code was handled by PHP, I found this frustrating, but perhaps I should have been a better presenter. 

But how can I actually be annoyed? Drupal is a divided community. With those who are serious backend folks and those who are serious GUI-end folks looking for the next module / theme that they feel will give them the edge or at least the final amount of control without needing to code. On the edges are folks like me who use it tangentially so don't really geek out about it. 

Given that divided ground, it makes me worry about the future of Drupal. Because its curators aren't all in the same place mentally, it's difficult to drive towards synced goals on the code and feature levels, unlike what I've seen in the Rails community. However, maybe this makes Drupal have a bright future, because it's end users (the GUI-folks) are so demanding of the coders to come out with things that work better together. 

Does the real guts of Drupal really lie in the salt of the earth conferences, or is it at the big conventions each year? I typically trust salt of the earth, actual use day to day, but perhaps that is much like the quickly stated, poorly thought out, immediately downvoted answers on Stackoverflow.

In order to see the real state of Drupal, it's not in everyone who uses it, but those who do so the best. Maybe Austin and Amersterdam might be worth it to change my mind.